Olivia Colman Source

Vanity Fair Italia–  She is world-famous for her role as The Queen in The Crown, however, she hopes that the Queen herself doesn’t watch The Crown.

Playing a “bourgeois” role, Olivia Colman admits that fame is a bit of a burden and that the
the only place she feels comfortable in is her home.

 

The night she won her Oscar, Olivia Colman ended up on stage without having any kind of draft of speech whatsoever, and so, when they handed her the statue, she took a deep breath, her emotions a mixture of laughter and tears, and said the only thing that came to her mind at that moment: “It’s genuinely stressful.”Laughters, applause… Then, in a speech that seemed like a brilliant number of stand-up comedy, Olivia – very English when it comes to underestimating herself as well as to humour – continued to make people laugh; at one point she even apologised to Glenn Close for winning instead of her, then she looked back at the time she used to clean for a living, and finally sent a message to the aspiring young actresses in the audience: “Any little girl who is practising their speech on telly, you never know” Her speech ended with a standing ovation.

The film for which she won was Yorgos Lanthimos’ Favourite, the amazing interpretation of Queen Anne. It’s been two years since that night, and Olivia Colman has remained the same down-to-earth actress that is instantly taken into consideration when it comes to playing British monarchs. Best known she is for her performance as Queen Elizabeth II, the most famous monarch in the world – the condensation of strength, seriousness and self-denial.

Her new film “The Father”, a film for which Anthony Hopkins won his second Oscar, has been out in theatres for a few days now. In the film, Olivia Colman plays Hopkin’s daughter, a woman who watches her father lose himself to dementia. Everything is narrated from the painful and unsettling point of view of the elderly man. Therefore, the viewer is put in the shoes of those who experience the disease firsthand. “I’ve never read such a script before: usually it’s the family’s experience that is described, here it is as if you were inside Anthony Hopkin’s head”, Colman describes through Zoom, sitting in her living room in London.

 

Anthony Hopkins said he didn’t want any other actresses to play his daughter.Did he really say that?

Olivia Colman: Oh, he just wanted to be nice.

We also see the esteem.
OC: Sure, but Anthony is also a sweet and kind man, he would have said that of any other actress. What I can say is that it has been a constant delight to get to wake up every morning and work with him on set. However, eventually, you come to realize that at the end of the day we are all just human beings.

What did you learn from him?
OC: I was struck by his joyful attitude towards life, his determination to enjoy it despite the bad things that have happened to him. It’s as if he was saying “I’m still here and I want to be fine.” That is not a very common mindset for seniors so it was a great lesson.

Do you share your way of dealing with life?
OC: In some ways yes, I also want to be very aware of how lucky I am, and I know who are the people I love and I love to be with. I don’t like parties or confusion. I love staying home.

So you haven’t suffered from the lockdowns?
OC: I am one of the few very happy people. I don’t even notice whether the pubs are open or closed.

And are you shy?
OC: Yes, I feel uncomfortable in large groups. I’m comfortable around my family.

Have you always been like that?
OC: No, but I have had to become that. You know, it’s not easy to walk into a room where everyone knows you but you don’t know anyone, the feeling is alienating.

So is fame hard to cope with?
OC: It is not easy to explain, but it is certainly something that no one wants to actually live with, and if someone says they would, they have no idea what it is like. It’s the downside of the job that I so very much love.

Can we say that you are an anti diva?
OC: I’m an actress and that’s it.

Your speech at the Oscars made everyone laugh.
OC: Oh my, I don’t even remember it anymore… But I can tell you that morning my husband and I got up and said to each other: we both know it’s not going to happen so let’s enjoy the evening, it happens once in a lifetime. Then my husband told me: however if you ever win… remember to thank all the fans. And him. So I did it.

How many times had you dreamed of that moment?
OC: So many, while cleaning, I would every now and then imagine and recite my Oscar speech. I think everyone has done it at least once, right?

How has your past influenced your ambitions and approach to work?
OC: I am grateful that I was not successful at a young age because it has really made me appreciate working today. This craft is very uncertain and there are so many actors unemployed. These are things to keep in mind when your life changes.

Your life changes but it always lead you to play queens…
OC: But it’s a coincidence!

A strange fact: you always say you are not a big fan of the monarchy.
OC: True, but I respect the Queen very much, she does what she has to do with dignity, other people in her position would not have behaved like her. Nonetheless, it is a job I wouldn’t want.

What do you mean by that?
OC: Being the queen is not a job you choose. You just have to do it. I, on the other hand, need to choose.

When did you choose to become an actress?
OC: At 16, during my first theatrical performance. But I didn’t tell anyone because I wasn’t sure I could do it.

And when did you discover that you have a talent?
OC: I am very fortunate and always try to improve myself.

Lucky but also talented: do you not recognise it?
OC: It sounds so bad coming from your own mouth. Laughs

Do you think the queen is watching The Crown?
OC: I hope not.

Why?
OC: Because she must think it is all wrong: the ways of doing things, the private conversations and relationships. The Crown is fiction and seeing yourself in a TV series must be something that makes you very angry.

 

 

 

MAGAZINES & SCANS > 2021 > VANITY FAIR ITALY, 23 JUNE 2021


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PHOTOSHOOTS > 2019 > HARPER’S BAZAAR BY ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI


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ET Online- Olivia Colman doesn’t remember much about the night she won her Oscar. She had been nominated for her performance in The Favourite, though in an especially tight Best Actress race, Glenn Close was the presumed frontrunner. But then the envelope was opened, and Frances McDormand read off Colman’s name. “This is hilarious,” she spluttered onstage, visibly dazed even as she cradled the gold statuette in her arms. “I’ve got an Oscar.”

Through tears, Colman thanked her co-stars and crew, as well as Close (“This is not how I wanted it to be!”) and her children, who she hoped were watching at home. (“This is not going to happen again.”) She wrapped up her speech by exclaiming both about and towards her fellow nominee: “Lady Gaga!”

“I can’t remember what I said. I only know because I’ve seen it played back now,” she tells ET over Zoom from her home in London. “I can’t remember what happened afterwards. My husband said it was the best night of his life. And had it been the other way around, if I could have watched him, I understand, I would have loved that, and I would’ve remembered everything. But I’m afraid I still can’t quite believe it happened.”

Contrary to what she said that night, Colman will soon have another chance to relive some of those memories, having earned her second Oscar nomination earlier this month.

This time, the recognition comes for her work in the dementia drama, The Father, which marks the directorial debut of French playwright Florian Zeller, adapted from his own award-winning stage show. The film centres on an ageing patriarch (Anthony Hopkins) struggling to make sense of his progressing memory loss. Unlike other works that have explored the same subject, this is told through Anthony’s perspective, the very fabric of the film — the sets, the timeline, even the actors — shifting as its lead fades into the fog of confusion. We, the viewer, experience what he might be.

“The first time I read it was the first time I’d ever experienced anything written from that point of view,” Colman says. “To suddenly make sense of the confusion because you are as confused. It’s been quite nice to understand where the confusion can stem from. If someone has been gentle in their lives, to suddenly see that they’ve got rage in them, is that the real them? Was the other one not the real them? But it’s OK. We’d all be f**king furious having to deal with this every day.”

Colman plays Anthony’s daughter and de facto caretaker, Anne. The play, and thus the film, was inspired by Zeller’s personal experiences with an ailing grandparent, making Colman’s character something like a surrogate for both himself and the audience. There she is, attendant and infinitely patient as she attempts to mask her breaking heart with a sunshiny hopefulness.

“She’s my favourite actress,” Zeller says of casting Colman. “And I think that the film would not have been the same without her. She has something magical. As soon as you see her, you love her. That was really important for the film because it’s not only about this man losing his bearings. It’s also about his daughter trying to face this situation.”

Zeller had written the script with Hopkins in mind, reasoning that because most people would have become familiar with Sir Anthony Hopkins throughout their lives, playing to his mortality would lend an additional layer of gravitas to the story. Colman found that to be the case when she got to set, explaining, “I’ve grown up with Tony’s face on films and I remember him being interviewed on Parkinson — it’s a chat show in the UK — and he was larger than life, a sort of acting god.”

“So, that made it extra poignant to me, I suppose, to watch this man who I admired so much confused or watch him crumple. All of that stuff in the back of my mind, in my history, helped,” she says. “And he’s so wonderful to act opposite. He is so good that I didn’t have to do anything except to watch him and feel it and react to him.”

The horrors of cognitive degeneration aside, Colman found filming to be especially enjoyable. “I suppose that sounds bonkers,” she laughs. Between takes, she sat with Hopkins and listened to him share stories of his storied life, slipping into impressions of Jimmy Stewart and Frank Sinatra for his delighted one-woman audience.

“I just sat there and I went, ‘Oh, please don’t say that we’re back on set. I’m just loving this so much.’ And he’d lean in and go, ‘Aren’t we lucky? Isn’t life beautiful?'” Colman giggles, trying on her own impression of Hopkins. “And I know there are lots of upsetting pieces in it, but we got to work with amazing people and the moment something sad is finished, you have a cup of tea and a cuddle and go, ‘It’s all right.’ And then you go do something else. You don’t carry on being miserable throughout the day. I wouldn’t be able to cope with that.”

The Father premiered at Sundance in early 2020 with a lauded festival run to follow. Still, Sony Pictures Classics, the studio behind the film, held off its theatrical release until the Oscars’ last eligible weekend, a risky move that nonetheless paid off: Not only is Colman nominated for Best Actress, but The Father is up for Best Picture and Hopkins for Best Actor, among six total nominations.

In an altogether unprecedented awards season, no one knows exactly what to expect from the forthcoming Academy Awards, let alone who might win one. Not that Colman believes it’s something you can ever prepare for, even now two years on from when she won her Oscar.

“I liken it to when I got married, someone said, ‘Every now and then, just pause and have a look and try and remember it all.’ Because it’s so much excitement and such a blur that when it’s all over, you go, ‘Well, all that planning, and I can’t remember it!'” Colman says. “The Oscars were a bit like that, just because I was sort of in a denial all the way. Sort of wafting into it, going, “It’s silly. It’s just silly. It can’t be real, can’t be real, can’t be happening.’ And then it happened.”

The Father is in theatres now and available on-demand on March 26.

 

don’t forget to check out our gallery for THE FATHER stills and more

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